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Patrick F. Campos

Patrick F. Campos is a film scholar, programmer, and associate professor at the University of the Philippines Film Institute and a member of NETPAC. His research investigates the intertwining of political and cinematic discourses and problematizes notions of ‘national’ and ‘regional’ cinema formations.

He is the author of The End of National Cinema (2016) and Scenes Reclaimed (2020), editor of Pelikula: A Journal of Philippine Cinema, and the special issues “Southeast Asian Horror Cinemas” for Plaridel, “The Politics of Religion in Southeast Asian Cinemas” for Situations, and “Contemporary Philippine Cinema” for Art Archive, among others.

Along with regional cinema scholars, he co-organizes the roving biennial Association of Southeast Asian Cinemas Conference, for which he recently put together the program Cinematic Counter-Cartographies of Southeast Asia. He has programmed for Guanajuato International Film Festival, Image Forum Festival, Minikino, Cinema Rehiyon, and curates the annual TINGIN Southeast Asian Film Festival in Manila.

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Zoe Butt

Zoe Butt is a curator and writer whose practice centres on building critically thinking and historically conscious artistic communities and fostering dialogue among cultures of the Global South. She was Artistic Director, Factory Contemporary Arts Centre, Ho Chi Minh City (2017-2021); Executive Director and Curator, Sän Art, Ho Chi Minh City (2009-2016); Director, International Programs, Long March Project, Beijing (2007-2009); and Assistant Curator, Contemporary Asian Art, Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane (2001-2007). She has been published widely and is a MoMA International Curatorial Fellow; a member of the Asia Society’s Asia 21 initiative; and member of the Asian Art Council, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. She is currently a PhD candidate with CREAM, University of Westminster, London.

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Megan Carnrite

Megan Carnrite is an artist, curator, and educator engaging in doctoral research at the Centre for Research and Education in Arts and Media (CREAM), University of Westminster. Her background in art practice and art history primarily focuses on photography and its relationship with the body. At CREAM, Megan is working on a feminist approach to cameraless photography and is concerned with the perceptual and performative experience of producing a photo. One of her primary points of concern is if and how the cameraless photographic object may present evidence of the maker’s body. Her other research interests include abjection, abstraction, art theory, European and American modernism, and materiality. Megan has advanced degrees from the University of Chicago and Maryland Institute of Art. As well as participating in numerous group and solo exhibitions, she has curated art exhibits, taught courses and worked in museum education, and has worked as a researcher on international exhibitions. She also contributes to publications as a writer and editor.

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Harry Meadows

Artist and lecturer Harry Meadows, is a doctoral researcher in Visual Art at the University of Westminster. He leads Critical Zone Observatory, a research framework exploring the intersection of climate data and art. Through partnerships with artists, musicians and scientists, he studies how our environment is interpreted through a mix of human senses and mechanical sensors.

Areas of research include: Learning from citizen scientists’ and amateur meteorologists’ methods of recording their environment and what this can offer to contemporary art practice; Exploring how scientific apparatus and technology act as extensions of our human senses; Investigating the human-scale objects we use to interface with the massive hyperobject of climate data the existential crisis it describes.

Since receiving an AHRC award and completing an MFA at Goldsmiths College, Meadows has exhibited with institutions such as The Venice Biennale of Architecture, The Barbican, Southbank Centre, Hayward Touring, UP Projects, Whitstable Biennial, Supernormal Festival and The Granary, Central St. Martins, also public engagement projects such as Coracle Regatta on the River Lea Navigation. He has worked as artist in residence at London Metropolitan University, Brazier’s Park, Studio36 Spike Island, Mothership and Kiosk7.

Meadows is Senior Lecturer in Fine Art at Arts University Bournemouth, Fellow of the Higher Education Academy and member of Deep Field Research Studios.

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Ellen Nolan

Ellen Nolan is a lens-based artist with a BA (Hons) in Photography from Nottingham Trent University and an MA in Fine Art from Goldsmiths College, University of London. She is a Senior Photography & Fashion Photography Lecturer at UCA Rochester.

Her doctoral research project draws directly from the physical family archive of her Great-Aunt Nita Harvey, (London) (1928-38). Using feminist film theory to underpin her approach, she aims to re-map the archive creating an innovative counter-hegemonic discourse on femininity and masquerade in 1930s Hollywood. Her practice-based PhD adopts an interdisciplinary approach investigating female identity, experience, and hidden history in relation to Hollywood in the 1930s. By re-mapping the archive trajectory from 1928-1938, she will create a meta-archive and new knowledge on female experience and documentation within a patriarchal system, enabling an examination of the contemporary shifts in representation of women within film and photography, whilst also exploring new strategies and contexts for lens-based performance and imagery that draw directly from the archive. By creating a discourse on Nita’s marginalised history and the conflicting patriarchal Hollywood mythology contained within the archive, she will attempt to reframe then and now.

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Ralph Klewitz

I was born in 1965, grew up in Switzerland and studied visual communication design as well as fine arts. In 2011 I graduated with a Master of Arts in Contemporary Arts Practice from the Bern University of the Arts, and since 2014 I am a doctoral candidate in Visual Arts.

The topics of my artistic practice and research in fine arts raise cultural, ethical and political questions and I negotiated those in various geographical contexts with meaningful and meaningless; intangible and tangible contents.

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Victoria Burgher

Victoria Burgher is an artist with a BA (Hons) in Ceramics from the University of Westminster and an MA in Art & Politics from Goldsmiths College, University of London. Her techne/AHRC doctoral research project uses porcelain as a ceramic material and investigative tool to reveal and challenge the hegemony of whiteness in relation to the values and legacy of British colonialism. Porcelain, cherished as it is for its ‘purity’, becomes an apt material and concept to embody, expose and contest social, cultural and historically constructed ideologies of whiteness. Her practice-based research explores how the properties of porcelain – its fractiousness and vulnerability when raw, its strength, whiteness and translucency when fired – can challenge terms such as fragility and innocence explored through ideologies of whiteness. Key to her project is interrogating how and in what spaces an artistic practice can be affective as anti-racist activism.

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Stav Bee

I am a visual artist, conceiving and manifesting an interdisciplinary body of work, that I have been developing and evolving, since I completed my MA in Photography. Spoken word, Live Art, Installation, Video and Sound. My current practice combines all of these elements, which have been incorporated and synthetically established for a multimedia presentation. Utilising my existing skills in conceiving and making performance/ video/ sound pieces is the starting point of my research.

My work is placed at the junctions of visual art and performance, and deals with the on-going theme of (sexual) identity, love, the politics of the female gaze, the aesthetics of beauty, obsession and transformation, nature and evolution. The linear progress of my body of work (from sketches to sound) has shaped my direction and focus. As I progress in the making of the work, I will go back in time for a future exhibition: analogue media is re-introduced for the expression and authentic validation (typewriters, Polaroid, 35mm and 120mm film and slides).

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John van Aitken

John van Aitken is a cultural worker exploring urban gentrification through the dynamics of creative destruction. His current practice-based PhD is centred on the transformation of Salford’s landscapes through housing-led redevelopment. It explores how expanded photographic practices can visualise new ways to open up debate about the consequences of such changes. Co-founder of the Institute of Urban Dreaming with Jane Brake (MMU), their recent publication explores the use of atmospheres and sensory spaces in the marketing of new vertical apartments (Being vertical: staging the vertical subject on the Manchester Salford border). He currently works as a Principal Lecturer at the University of Central Lancashire.

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Lucy Rogers

Lucy Rogers is an artist and writer, currently undertaking Techne (AHRC) funded doctoral research with CREAM at the University of Westminster. Her research focuses on the archive of the photographer, Ursula Schulz-Dornburg.

With a background in sculpture, her writing and practice focus on photography’s role in the construction of space, site and memory. Lucy holds a master’s in Photography Studies and Practice from the Folkwang University of the Arts, Essen, Germany and a bachelor’s in Fine Art from Byam School of Art, Central St Martins, London, UK. She has been the recipient of a number of grants and awards for her photography practice.

Since June 2020, Lucy shares the role of Editor-in-Chief for Hyphen Journal, Issue 3: Ecologies. She is also a contributor to the photography platform, C4 Journal.

 

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