Diann Bauer

Diann Bauer is an artist and writer based in London. She studied both art and architecture at the Cooper Union in NY and Goldsmiths College, London. She is a research affiliate at Autonomy, London and on the advisory board of Treignac Project, France. She is part of Laboria Cuboniks, with whom she collaboratively wrote and published Xenofeminism, A Politics for Alienation in 2015. and A.S.T. (the Alliance of the Southern Triangle), a working group of artists, architects and curators that use the art field as a platform to broaden interdisciplinary collaboration with a focus on urbanism and sea level rise. Her research at Westminster aims to develop conceptual tools for thinking about time at extra-human scales in the light of global climate change.

Bauer has taught and lectured widely at universities and cultural institutions including: Cornell University, Yale University, The New School and The Cooper Union (US), HKW (Berlin), ETH (Zürich), DAI (Netherlands), Ashkal Alwan (Beirut), Goldsmiths, RCA, UAL, UCA, The Tate and the ICA (London).

She has screened and exhibited at Tate Britain, The ICA, The Showroom and FACT Liverpool, Deste Foundation, Athens, The New Museum, and Socrates sculpture park, New York and recently completed a project with Arts at CERN.

Catherine Roche

Catherine Roche has a BA (Hons) in Fine Art from Reading University and an MA in Art History from Aberystwyth University. She has worked as an artist and lecturer in Fine Art for over twenty years, and more recently as a freelance writer with a particular interest in contemporary ceramic practice. She has contributed essays, reviews and interviews to various publications including Ceramic Review, Ceramics: Art and Perception, CCQ Magazine, New Ceramics, Sync Tank and a-n news, as well as writing catalogue essays, chairing artist discussion panels and participating in gallery ‘in conversation’ events with ceramic practitioners. She is currently working towards a theory focused PhD within the Ceramics Research Centre UK at Westminster University.

Catherine’s doctoral research project positions clay and ceramic artworks within the discourse of embodied audience perception. It considers their distinctive material and conceptual qualities that are differential from other forms of three-dimensional art practice, in order to establish an innovative theoretical framework for clay-based making that applies new perspectives to existing phenomenological sculptural theories. In doing so, she proposes clay-based artworks as phenomenologically potent, offering unique potentials that reveal and support embodied viewer experiences. Catherine presented her research papers ‘Crafted identities: Embracing Shared Perspectives Through Phenomenological Interpretation of Ceramic Practice’ at the 2017 European Sociological Association Conference in Athens, and ‘Crafting Sculpture: Embodied Perspectives of Sculptural Ceramics’ at the Association for Art History summer symposium (Re)Forming Sculpture held at The Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield and  Leeds University in 2018.

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Bisan Abu Eisheh

For his PhD research, Abu Eisheh is investigating how the political situation resulted by the signing of the Oslo Agreement, between the Palestinian Liberation Organization and the Israeli State, affected on the roles of Palestinian politicizes art practices within the Palestinian context. Through developing a practice situated between using archives, fiction and mind map, Abu Eisheh is trying to unpack some of the multilayered complexities of what is universally known as Palestinian Art.

Bisan Abu Eisheh (1985) is an artist coming from Palestine, where he was born and raised in the city of Jerusalem. Abu Eisheh is using art as a tool to investigate history, society and politics. Working across media, such as video, installations and interventions, with a practice situated both within the gallery space and the public sphere, his work attempts to create a shared awareness for himself as well as his audience about several details lost within grand narratives. Researching through different resources, from conversation and oral testimonies to archives and collected objects he tries to challenge the aesthetics of his artworks in order to bring some facts under the eyes of his viewers. By doing so, his works often aspire to open a dialog and, perhaps, seek answers related to several topics such as national identity, mobility, migration and socio-political injustice. Abu Eisheh believes that such complex topics often requires fragmenting the work into several phases of exploration and experimentation, which eventually leads to the final outcome. He values process as much as production and therefore endeavor to share these processes publicly at various stages before reaching the final project outcome.

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George Clark

George Clark is an artist, writer and curator. His films have exhibited at festivals and museums internationally. Bridging curatorial and artistic practice, George Clark’s work explores the history of images and how they are governed by culture and technology as well as social and political conditions. His most recent work Double Ghosts is an evolving multi-part project, presented at the 2018 Taiwan Biennale, National Taiwan Museum of Fine Art (Taichung, September 2018-February 2019). He is co-founder of the West Java West Yorkshire Cooperative Movement, a collaborative project with the Jatiwangi Art Factory and Pavilion.

His curatorial work is focused on exploring and expanding histories of film and video practice globally. Through his work at Tate Modern (2013- 2015) and in independent projects, he has curated retrospectives of Ute Aurand, Julian Dashper, Lav Diaz, Camille Henrot, Vlado Kristl, Luis Ospina and Chick Strand, as well as thematic series Throwing Shadows: Japanese Expanded Cinema in the Time of Pop (Tate Modern, 2016, co-curated with Go Hirasawa and Julian Ross), L.A. Rebellion: Creating a New Black Cinema (Tate Modern, 2015), and Infermental (co-curated with Dan Kidner and James Richards, Focal Point Gallery, Southend-On-Sea, UK 2010). He is co-founder of the West Java West Yorkshire Cooperative Movement, a collaborative project with the Jatiwangi Art Factory and
Pavilion. He is currently working towards a PhD at University of Westminster.

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Eddy Hackett

As a soloist and chamber musician, Eddy Hackett has given recitals at the Wigmore Hall, Tonhalle Zurich, Feldkirch Festival, TAK Theatre Liechtenstein as well as the Universities of Glasgow, Edinburgh, Aberdeen and St Andrews. He is the founder of London Percussion and is Principal Percussionist of the Arensky Chamber Orchestra. Eddy has performed with more than 30 professional orchestras worldwide – often within the capacity of Guest Principal. This includes groups such as the London Philharmonic Orchestra, Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Britten Sinfonia, City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra, Philharmonia Orchestra and Royal Philharmonic Orchestra. His highlights as a performer include: tours to the USA, continental Europe, Far East, and South East Asia; TV, radio, cinema and live streaming broadcasts; engagements at major international festivals such as the BBC Proms and Edinburgh International Festival; and recording sessions for films including ’The Hobbit’. Eddy has given over a dozen performance masterclasses, including at the Universities of Glasgow, Aberdeen, St Andrews and Tokushima Bunri in Japan and is regularly invited as a guest lecturer at universities throughout the UK on the subject of creative entrepreneurship and innovative performance platforms. Eddy was Head of Percussion at the Qatar Music Academy in 2015, Percussion Teacher at Junior Trinity from 2012-2014 and is a regular deputy at Junior Academy. Eddy received his BMus from the Royal Academy of Music in London, and his MMus from the Manhattan School of Music in New York, for which he received several scholarships and awards. As a student, he was a member of the Gustav Mahler Jugendorchester, European Union Youth Orchestra and was the percussionist for the 2008 Southbank Sinfonia season. In 2004 Eddy reached the percussion finals of the BBC Young Musician of the Year. He is married to the harpist Stephanie Beck.

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Ana Janeiro

Ana Janeiro uses self-portraiture and performance photography in her artistic research. She is currently a doctoral student at the CREAM research centre at the University of Westminster, London. Her PhD thesis explores the construction of identity through self-portraiture and family photography. She studied fine Arts at the Universidade de Lisboa, in Lisbon and in the Kent Institute of Art and Design (MA Photography) in Rochester, UK. She has exhibited regularly since mid-2000. The following solo shows are of special note: “La Vue. Deux Objets charment une belle, un amant, un miroir fidele”;, Palácio Marquês de Pombal (2016); ALBUM, Índia Portuguesa 1951-1961, Laboratório das Artes, Guimarães (2010); “Who’s the fairest one of all?”, Paulo Amaro Gallery, Lisbon (2010); “Onze”, Vera Cortês Art Agency, Lisbon (2005). She is an Invited Associate Professor at the School of Communication and Media Studies of the Lisbon Polytechnic. She is represented in several art collections.

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Trenton Lee

Trenton Lee is a PhD Candidate and Visiting Lecturer at the University of Westminster in the Communication and Media Research Institute (CAMRI). With a BA in Sociology and Women’s Studies and a MA in Social Media, Culture and Society, he focuses his research at the intersection between political economy and a feminist approach to the understanding of digital media technologies. His doctoral research project is a digital ethnography of YouTube’s creator community, exploring the effects of digital commodification on the identity formation and presentation processes of these entrepreneurial subjects.

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David Leahy

Originally from New Zealand, David Leahy has spent the last 19 years living and working in the UK as a double bass player, composer and contact improvising dancer. David’s experience across the performing arts spreads across performance, teaching and research. He is currently completing a practice-based research PhD investigating aspects of spatialization within improvised music performance. This research challenges the perceived wisdom of the formal separation and static positioning of the audience and performer. David argues that the traditional performance conventions do little to support the improvised musical process, that is supposedly built on the close inter-relationship of all the elements of the musicking ecosystem.

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Barbara Matas Moris

Barbara Matas Moris’ film and video works have been shown internationally. Matas Moris has had four retrospectives of her works: Festival de Cine Mudo de La Serena, Chile in 2010; Inauguration of the video art category for the film festival FemCine, Chile, 20012; H2O gallery, Barcelona 2013; Monoloco Gallery, Santiago de Chile, Chile 2016. Barbara Matas Moris has taught film for over 10 years: UNIACC, American University of Paris, she also worked at Harvard Film Study Centre and directed The Film Centre CineUC in Chile. At present, she is the senior lead tutor for the 6-month filmmaking course at Met Film School. Matas Moris’s practice has benefited from collaborations with several artists, notably Robert Gardner, Robert Fenz and Livia Corona.

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Arne Sjögren

Arne Sjögren is a practice-based PhD Researcher at CREAM, University of Westminster. He works with multimedia to explore fictionalised interpretations of historical events derived from family interviews, archives and personal memories. His doctoral research looks at the spatial layering; temporal arrangements; and points of view afforded by the digital narratives arising from the hybrid assemblage of multimedia elements and live action.

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The CREAM doctoral programme hosts a thriving international community of researchers exploring issues in art and design, film, photography, moving image, ceramics, cultural studies, art and technology/science, and music.

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